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Pages tagged "Show tag:Health professionals"

‘It’s a new system and there are still some challenges’

Dr Sarah Pickstock, a West Australian palliative care specialist, has supported more than 16 patients through the VAD process. She says its intimacy and impact shouldn’t be underestimated.

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Why this doctor changed his mind about voluntary assisted dying

Melbourne oncologist Dr Phillip Parente, a one-time conscientious objector, says he now feels comfortable with offering patients assistance to die. 'I believe it's the right thing to do'.

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'I was a late convert to voluntary assisted dying'

Victorian physician James Hurley says working as a VAD doctor has enabled him to give back to the community in a way he did not anticipate

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'We've seen gentle, beautiful deaths'

Fiona Jane manages a community hospice in Western Australia’s Great Southern region. She explains how the choice of voluntary assisted dying is bringing comfort to the people in her care.

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Drs Ian Catto and Mary Collins

"Even if one dying person suffers unnecessarily, it is one too many."

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Dr Mary Collins and Prof Fiona Stanley

What if you could have a beautiful death? Free from suffering, in control and with your family around you?

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Dr Ian Catto

I graduated from medical school 40 years ago. Increasingly I have seen divisiveness amongst medical practitioners caused by the ambiguities of the law regarding alleviation of suffering for the terminally ill.

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Peta Nottle, one of Australia's first palliative care nurses

As one of Western Australia’s longest serving registered nurses and one of Australia’s first to specialise in palliative care, Peta Nottle, 72, has seen more of death than most people.

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My sister, Peggie

My late father used to say that suffering from advanced emphysema was like gasping for air after running a marathon, and having a sock stuffed into your mouth. So when my sister Peggie Nairn also developed cigarette-induced emphysema she had some idea of what to expect.

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Dr Felicity Haynes' mother Joan

My mother, Joan Freeth, died of breast cancer in a slow and painful death, propped up with morphine. I would have liked her to be able to go more easily without the horrific pain she suffered towards the end.

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